Rich As A King

Friday, November 21, 2014

Anand - Carlsen game 10 LIVE Video Commentary!


Welcome to Carlsen - Anand Sochi World Championship game 10 LIVE Commentary

Thanks for joining me. After 9 games, the score is 5 - 4 in favor of Magnus. Anand will have two white games in the last three battles. 


I will be doing LIVE video commentary with my Chennai co-commentator GM Ramesh RB for game 10 and 11. It is FREE to everyone worldwide, courtesy of ICC. 

In order to view our LIVE broadcast, register for a FREE ICC User Name, then download the FREE software here: http://www.chessclub.com/download-software

In addition to being able to join GM Ramesh RB and me for game 10 and 11, you will also get 30 days of FREE membership with unlimited play. Big thanks to ICC for this generous offer.

Since some of you may be at work and cannot view our LIVE video broadcast, I will have various assistants help me relay my commentary on Twitter, Facebook, and right here on this blog. This way, no fan will miss out the excitement of game 10 and 11.

We will select some of the most interesting questions and answer them on the air.

Here are the rules of the match:

The Match is played over a maximum of twelve games and the winner of the match shall be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the scores are level after the twelve games, after a new drawing of colors, four tie-break games shall be played. The games shall be played using the electronic clock starting with 25 minutes for each player with an increment of 10 seconds after each move. In case the match is still drawn, a match of 2 games shall be played with a time control of 5 minutes plus 3 seconds increment after each move. In case of a level score, another 2-game match will be played to determine a winner. If still there is no winner after 5 such matches (total 10 games), one sudden-death game will be played.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 We have another Grunfeld.

5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 O-O 7. e4 Na6 8. Be2 c5 9. d5 e6 10. O-O exd5 11. exd5 Re8 The players are banging out moves very rapidly. In this position, 12. Rd1 has been played by Anand before. It is also the most popular line. The question is does Anand have a surprise?

12. Bg5 Anand spent a bit of time for this move. It deviated from what Anand played in the past. The battle will be the d pawn. This is not a new move but it is not as popular.


12...h6 Magnus is still in his preparation and he is playing quite fast. We are following the Wojtaszek - Ponomariov game.

13. Be3 We are lucky to witness an aggressive game as Magnus chose not to go for a more tame line.

13...Bf5 Will Anand follow Wojtaszek's idea of Rad1. It is interesting to note that Wojtaszek is in Anand's camp. So we can expect to see some of his idea in play.

14. Rad1 Previous popular move is Qb6.

14...Ne4 is a move recommended by GM Ramesh.

15. Nxe4 Two choices to recapture. Rxe4 is a little stronger but both playable. The reason is black would gain a tempo attacking the Queen. In such an important match, it becomes an important guessing game by both camps as to what the other side prepares for. And even if they know the lines, they need to take time to make sure they do not mix up move order.

15...Bxe4 Magnus spent a lot of time for this move. This is not as strong as 15...Rxe4. Magnus is known to sometimes play inferior lines just to throw his opponents off track. 16. d6 is the best response. But Rd2 is also playable. I think the Indian fans should be happy that Anand has a more dynamic position to try to play for a win. Anand clearly understands the importance of this game. This is why he is taking his time and checking everything very carefully.

16. Qc1 Both Ramesh and I prefer 16. d6. But this move clears the diagonal for the e3 Bishop while attacking the h6 pawn. Black can try Qf6 to attack the b2 pawn.


16...Qf6 Two main options for Anand is either 17. Bxh6 or 17. d6. Many journalists wrote off Anand after the Chennai match. Now that Anand won the candidates tournament and still in this match, the media is excited again.

17. Bxh6 Qxb2 If 18. Qxb2 Bxb2 19. Ng5 Bd4 20. Nxe4 Rxe4 21. Bf3 Re7 22. d6 Rd7 23. Bf4 is something Anand is looking at. 18. Bc4 is another option. Anand can't avoid trading Queens. Magnus is a strong endgame player in spite of his young age. But this is a potential endgame Anand can push.

18. Qxb2 Bxb2 Anand has a few options: Ng5, d6, or Bc4 all playable‏.

19. Ng5 the strongest option. Anand in the driver seat with a better endgame. Magnus has to work to hold this game. There are some problems on the board he needs to solve. Magnus knows that this is a critical position so he is taking his time evaluating all options.

19...Bd4 There was a slight transmission error and the move 19...Bxg2 was shown. It caused an uproar because 20. Bxa6 Bxf1 21. Bxf1 and white is much better. Thankfully for Magnus' fans, it was not the move and Magnus played the correct 19...Bd4.

Now if Anand chooses 20. Nxe4 Rxe4 21. Bf3 Ree8 22. Bg5 f6 23. Bf4 Rad8 24. d6 g5 25. Bg3 f5 26. Bxb7 f4 27. Bxf4 gxf4 28. Bxa6 Rxd6 Even though white is a pawn up, the Bishops are on opposite colors.

20. Nxe4 Rxe4 21. Bf3 If 21...Re7 22. d6 Rd7 23. Bf4 Anand with Bishop pair and dangerous d pawn.

21...Re7 Even with a pleasant position, unless Magnus makes a mistake, it is not enough for Anand to win.

22. d6 Rd7 23. Bf4 A possibility is Nb4 going after the a2 pawn or back to c6. Knight on a6 not in play.


23...Nb4 What to do. Defend a2 pawn with Rd2 or push the knight back with a3?

24. Rd2 Re8 White's initiative is shrinking. Anand is still better but not very much. I still believe Magnus will hold with accurate play.

25. Rc1 Re6 26. h4 Be5 27. Bxe5 Rxe5 28. Bxb7 Rxb7 29. d7 Nc6 30. d8=Q+ Nxd8 31. Rxd8+ Kg7 32. Rd2 And the players agreed to a draw.

You need to think about Anand's state of mind. He is down by 1 pt with just a few games left. He has to decide how much risks to take. If he risks too much and loses, the match is basically over. Not an easy position or decision to make. The fans need to consider this before criticizing Anand for not going "nuts" during the game. It is a calculated by him.

Anand - Carlsen 2014 game 10 LIVE!

Ukrainian Championship LIVE!

Sharjah Chess 2014 LIVE!

10 second chess tactic


White to move. How should white proceed?

Source: ChessToday.net

Anand: I just have to press harder with White


Game 9

The ninth game of the Carlsen-Anand Match ended in a draw.

The overall score after the ninth game is Carlsen 5 - Anand 4.

The ninth game of the World Chess Championship match between Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and Viswanathan Anand (India) was played on November 20th in the Main Media Center in Sochi. The World Champion had White.

The players went for the Berlin Variation of the Ruy Lopez, the same opening that occurred in the seventh game. That game ended in a draw on 122nd move, and Anand was on the ropes for the most part of it. This time the scenario was completely different.

The Norwegian deviated from the seventh game on the move 11. Apparently he was confident the opponent analyzed their previous game carefully and will make a draw with ease. However, his new move also did not surprise Anand, who demonstrated a paradoxical idea: he developed the light-squared bishop to a6 first, provoking an active centralizing move of the white knight, and modestly retreated the bishop from a6 to b7 on the next move.

At first glance such waste of a tempo looked like a complete ignorance to the opening principle of not moving the same piece twice. Black was still undeveloped and his king was stuck in the center. According to the same general principles White opened the central files immediately in order to get to the enemy king, however Anand turned out really well prepared for such course of events. His king was surprisingly secure, while the pieces quickly joined the action. Carlsen realized that White has no opening advantage, and if the game continues, Black can seize the initiative thanks to his bishop pair. Therefore White utilized an opportunity to force a draw by perpetual.

Magnus Carlsen acknowledged that his opponent was better prepared in the opening and added: “Always better to be able to press with White, but draw is okay with the current score in the match”.

Vishy Anand: “An easy draw with Black is good for confidence, I just have to press harder with White”.

The match score is now 5-4 in Carlsen's favor. The tenth game is played on Friday, November 21st at 15:00 local time. Viswanathan Anand plays White. Admission is free of charge. The official website of the championship www.sochi2014.fide.com broadcasts live grandmaster commentary in Russian and English.

Chennai Commentary Team is back for Carlsen - Anand game 10 & 11


On November 21st and 23rd, the 2013 World Championship commentators from Chennai join forces once again! GM Susan Polgar and GM Ramesh R.B. will be in the virtual booth for the ICC!

And ICC is making these two days FREE for everyone! Yes, that's right: everyone will be able to log in and listen to the live commentary!

Nov. 21 Friday

Game #10 GM Ramesh R.B. and GM Susan Polgar

Nov. 23 Sunday
Game #11 GM Ramesh R.B. and GM Susan Polgar

If you are not a member yet, you can download the FREE software here: http://www.chessclub.com/download-software. Then join GM Ramesh RB and me for game 10 and 11!

Make the Most of Piece Exchanges Part 2: Examples ... and more



Learn From Your Fellow Amateurs 5 - NM Dana Mackenzie
Posted on November 19,2014 By OnlineChessLessons.NET Contributor in Strategy & Game Review, Chess Openings, All Articles w/ Videos, General Chess Articles. The Marshall variation in The French! Learn From Your Fellow Amateurs 5 - NM Dana Mackenzie, from the ChessLecture series. All levels of ability will learn from this late middle game - pre endgame transition. The game features the French Defense "Marshall variation", but it's all about the middle game and Dana is keen to show that pieces and players should not be pushed around simply because your opponent has made a threat. Saving lost games is a[...]

Advanced Pawns: An underestimated weapon
Posted on November 18,2014 By GM Levan Aroshidze in Strategy & Game Review, General Chess Articles, Beginner's Corner. A pawn is advanced if it enters the opponent's territory, i.e. reaches the fifth or higher rank. Advanced pawns can be very powerful weapons that are often underestimated by inexperienced players. Examples of Advanced Pawns in Play First of all, we have to understand that the advanced pawn is not necessarily a passed pawn. In the first example, an advanced pawn is blocked by the opponent's. So, it looks as though the g5 and h6 pawns are giving so[...]

An Opening Repertoire for the Attacking Player - IM Valeri Lilov
Posted on November 17,2014 By OnlineChessLessons.NET Contributor in Strategy & Game Review, Chess Openings, All Articles w/ Videos, General Chess Articles. Tired of a normal opening repertoire? What about this! IM Valeri Lilov gives a good overview of the Sicilian Dragon, fabled for its sharpness and complexity. The presenter takes this opening head on and looks at a very sharp and popular variation of the Dragon, and clinically dissects its complexity in little chunks, Valeri also explains which lines are popular and which are not. Beginners will find this opening analysis fascinating while interme[...]

Make the Most of Piece Exchanges Part 2: Examples
Posted on November 14,2014 By GM Levan Aroshidze in Strategy & Game Review, General Chess Articles, Beginner's Corner. In part one of this topic we covered some of the theory of the Piece Exchange Technique. The right piece exchanges can win the game without any tactical strikes. These five examples demonstrate how this works in practice. Playing With a Slight Advantage In this first example, Black has the slightly better position. There are b2 and d4 weaknesses and Black needs to keep the rook alive in order to attack those pawns together with the queen. Any mov[...]


OnlineChessLessons.net is a producer of thousands of free chess articles and free chess videos by FIDE chess masters. They recently released the renowned Empire Chess series that has been taking the chess world by storm. Please consider checking out their chess blog and chess shop with tons of free updated previews.

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Carlsen: He was better prepared than me in this game


Chess game 9: Viswanathan Anand and Magnus Carlsen share honours again
Vignesh Radhakrishnan, Hindustan Times
New Delhi, November 20, 2014

In the ninth game of the World Chess Championship, Viswanathan Anand playing with black pieces drew with Magnus Carlsen after just 20 moves on Thursday.

Analysis

Anand started with Berlin defence - 1.e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6, 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 - in game 9. Learn more about Berlin defence here.

Anand was very well prepared in this game, that much was evident. Forcing Carlsen for a quick draw that too when he is playing white, is not easy. Carlsen is not the kind of player who will go for a draw if he is ahead in a championship.

Susan Polgar, famous chess commentator, tweeted, "It's very very very unusual for Magnus to take such a quick draw with white. Anand and team have to be ecstatic."

The interesting fact is that, it was Carlsen who forced the draw. In fact he took so much time thinking in this game after every Anand move; it looked like he didn't expect this position. Seeing Anand's better position and also his preparation level Carlsen avoided a long battle forcing a draw.

Polgar continued to tweet, "Anand spent 15 mins for 19 moves and easy draw. Magnus spent 49 minutes. This shows good prep by Anand and his team."

Carlsen later recounted in the press conference, "Well, he was better prepared. I didn't quite see what to do."

The queens were off the board in the game as early as move 8.

Then Anand brought his bishops to play. He placed both his bishops pointing at Carlsen's knights. The Indian Grand Master also connected his rooks by moving his king one square up.

So everything was set for Anand to start a full-fledged attack. The Indian Grand Master had quick replies for every move Carlsen managed.

Carlsen gave it a thought and went for a forced repetition in move 17. Anand may have played on by breaking the repetition but that would have resulted in a small positional disadvantage for him as he would have to move his king back and disconnect his rooks.

So he played along Carlsen's repetition plan and the game was well over in just one hour and under 20 moves.

There are three games left in the championship. Out of which, Anand has two white games, while Carlsen has one. Game 10 will be played tomorrow. Carlsen is leading in the championship 5-4.

Pavlodar Open 2014


The 2014 edition of Pavlodar Open is scheduled to be held from 20th November to 10th December 2014 in Pavlodar, a city in northeastern Kazakhstan.

The event is a 10-round Swiss tournament with tempo of play 90 minutes for 40 moves plus 30 minutes for the rest of the game plus 30 seconds increment starting from move one.

The preliminary list of players consists of 61 participants from six different countries (Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Russia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan), including 18 GMs, 4 IMs, 5 FMs, 2 WGMs and 1 WIM.

Top seeded are GM Zaven Andriasian ARM (2609), GM Sergey Volkov RUS (2599), GM Aleksej Aleksandrov BLR (2590), GM Alexander Zubarev UKR (2588) and GM Rinat Jumabayev KAZ (2572)

The prize fund in the amount of 10.000 USD, provided by the Povlodar Chess Federation, will be awarded as follows:
Main prizes: 450.000 KZT (nearly 2.400 USD)/ 350.000 KZT/ 250.000 KZT/ 250.000 KZT/ 100.000 KZT/ 70.000 KZT/ 60.000 KZT/ 50.000 KZT/ 40.000 KZT/ 30.000 KZT/ 5 X 20.000 KZT
Best Pavlodar player: 25.000 KZT/ 15.000 KZT/ 10.000 KZT
Best female player: 25.000 KZT/ 15.000 KZT/ 10.000 KZT
Best senior: 25.000 KZT/ 15.000 KZT/ 10.000 KZT
Best player U16: 25.000 KZT/ 15.000 KZT/ 10.000 KZT
Best player U2300: 25.000 KZT/ 15.000 KZT/ 10.000 KZT
Best player U2100: 25.000 KZT/ 15.000 KZT/ 10.000 KZT
183 KZT = 1 USD

Contacts:
GM Pavel Kotsur, Head coach of the Pavlodar Region
Email: 345965@mail.ru
Tel.: +7 777 1996747
IM Evgeny Egorov, Kazakhstan Chess Federation responsible secretary
Email: egorpavl@mail.ru
Tel.: + 7 705 1122335

Official website

Draw after 6 checks


World Chess Championship Anand vs Carlsen
Game 9 drawn
by FP Sports Nov 20, 2014 18:54 IST


PLAYER REACTION

Carlsen: I don't quite see what to do. It seems like the match is going the distance. I think my play has been quite inconsistent both in terms of preparation and overall play. Anand was better prepared than me in this game. It is tougher (vs Anand here) than in Chennai. It depends on my mood (if he plays what was prepared or what he feels like at the board). If there's any disappointment with a short draw with White then it's easier to swallow (it) when you're up in the match.

Anand: I would rather not explain (the opening strategy). (My confidence is) quite reasonable. I'll have to try harder with White. I will focus on this match. I don't think about Chennai (match) a lot.

Sudden draw - after six checks from Carlsen

Vishy is the first to drop a novelty on the board For those of you who are wondering why didn't Vishy go for Bb7 directly, instead of Ba6 first and then Bb7 , here is the difference : direct Bb7 gives white the option of Nd4-Nd4-Nd4 and now black doesn't have the resource of pushing away the knight with c5 (which he had in the Ba6 line ) because of Nb5, with clear advantage.

Entering the middle game

Berlin explained by Susan Polgar: In the Berlin, black voluntarily allows the Queen exchange, forfeits his right to castle, and allows the double c pawn.

Carlsen first to deviate

Expert say: Carlsen is not in the mood to repeat the variation from game 7. He is the first to deviate, the previous game saw 11.Bf4. This one sees b6.

Source: http://www.firstpost.com

Aronian - Nakamura show down


For all media inquries, please:
Brian Jerauld
Communications Specialist
Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis
bjerauld@saintlouischessclub.org

Showdown in Saint Louis Begins Friday for Nakamura, Aronian

SAINT LOUIS (November 20, 2014) – The bell rings tomorrow for a battle between two of the world’s heavyweights.

The United States’ super Grandmaster Hikaru Nakamura will square off against GM Levon Aronian, the World No. 4, in the Showdown in Saint Louis, a five-round contest for the lion’s share of a $100,000 purse. The special head-to-head exhibition will include four classical games of chess and a final round featuring 16 games of Blitz. The event will run from Friday, Nov. 21 to Tuesday, Nov. 25, with each round’s first move made at 2:00 p.m. daily. Each game will be broadcast live on www.uschesschamps.com.

Nakamura, the top American player ranked No. 9 in the world according to FIDE’s November 2014 rating list, is in the hunt for his first Candidates Tournament appearance and today holds second place, halfway through the 2014-2015 FIDE Grand Prix cycle. Aronian, a veteran to the world ranks, has long-been regarded as the main rival to World Champion Magnus Carlsen and reached his career-peak rating of 2830 earlier this year. Along with providing both players with elite head-to-head match experience, the Showdown in Saint Louis will also settle the score from the players’ last meeting: drawing twice at the 2014 Sinquefield Cup in the U.S. Capital of Chess last September.

GM HIKARU NAKAMURA vs. GM LEVON ARONIAN, SHOWDOWN IN SAINT LOUIS

Friday, November 21, 2:00 p.m.

Classical Round 1

Saturday, November 22, 2:00 p.m.

Classical Round 2

Sunday, November 23, 2:00 p.m.

Classical Round 3

Monday, November 24, 2:00 p.m.

Classical Round 4

Tuesday, November 25, 2:00 p.m.

Blitz Round (16 games, one every 15 minutes)

Alongside the Showdown are two specialized invitational tournaments designed for up-and-coming players attempting to earn chess’ elite master titles: International Master and, the superior, Grandmaster. The 2014 GM/IM Invitational events are two 10-player, round-robin tournaments designed to award title “norms,” or superior performances required by FIDE for player titles.

Of special focus in the GM norm event is Samuel Sevian and Ashwin Jayaram, two players who have already collected three Grandmaster norms and need just a handful of rating points to pass the necessary FIDE watermark of 2500. If Sevian clears the mark, the 13-year-old will become the youngest American Grandmaster in the history of chess.

Congratulations to GM & FST Adrian Mikhalchishin


Webster University / SPICE - Full and partial chess scholarships available



If you would like to be a part of the #1 College Chess program in the United States, please feel free to contact me (SusanPolgar@aol.com). Full and partial scholarships available for qualified student players.

Webster University – SPICE Chess Program Top 10 Facts

1. Webster University has 11 Grandmasters from 10 different countries. The SPICE program has 4 World Champions, 11 Olympians, and 17 National Champions...

2. Webster University chess team has been ranked #1 in Division I College Chess since its inception in August 2012 (with 4 freshmen and 1 sophomore on the A team), which is over 120 consecutive weeks.

3. Webster University A team has never relinquished the top ranking and has never lost a match.

4. Webster University team members won 2 world championships and 23 national titles in the past 2 years.

5. Webster University won the last 2 straight Final Four Championships, both by 2.5 points, the largest ever margin in College Chess history.

6. Webster University won the last PanAm InterCollegiate Chess Championship with a perfect 6-0 score, and won all 3 Final Four matches, to close out the season with an unprecedented perfect 9-0.

7. Webster University sophomore Wesley So won the World University Championship, and is ranked #12 in the world. Webster University freshman Le Quang Liem won the World Blitz Championship, and is ranked in the top 40 in the world. Illia Nyzhnyk and Ray Robson are both ranked as top 10 juniors under 21 in the world.

8. Webster University sponsors and hosts the annual SPF Girls' Invitational, the most prestigious all-girls event in the U.S., as well as the annual prestigious SPICE Cup.

9. Students of Webster University actively volunteer in the community to bring chess into schools. They, as a team, also maintain a very high GPA.

10. The SPICE chess program has won 4 consecutive Final Four Championships, and has not lost a match in 4 straight Final Four Championships.

2014 - 2015 Webster University – SPICE chess team members

1. GM Le Quang Liem (Vietnam) – World Blitz Champion, National Champion, Olympian
2. GM Wesley So (Philippines) – World University Champion, National Champion, Olympian
3. GM Illia Nyzhnyk (Ukraine) – National Champion, European Champion
4. GM Ray Robson (USA) – National Champion, Olympian
5. GM Georg Meier (Germany) – National Champion, Olympian, European Champion
6. GM Vasif Durarbayli (Azerbaijan) – World Youth Champion

7. GM Fidel Corrales Jimenez (Cuba) – National Champion, Olympian
8. GM Manuel Leon Hoyos (Mexico) – National Champion, Olympian
9. GM Andre Diamant (Brazil) – National Champion, Olympian
10. GM Denes Boros (Hungary) – National Champion
11. GM-elect Ashwin Jayaram (India) – National Champion
12. IM Vitaly Neimer (Israel) – National Champion
13. FM Jake Banawa (USA) – National Champion
14. WGM Anna Sharevich (Belarus) – National Champion, Olympian
15. WIM Inna Agrest (Sweden) – National Champion, Olympian
16. WFM Luisa Mercado (Colombia) – National Champion
17. Mara Kamphorst (Brazil) – National Champion
18. Paul M. Truong (USA) – National Champion
19. Tori Whatley (USA)
20. Reginald Jackson (USA)

Webster students are around the world. There are 22,000+ students enrolled at Webster University - with students from 50 states and 148 countries around the world.

Webster University offers academic excellence in more than 100 programs offered at a vibrant home campus and at locations throughout the world, with all the benefits of a student-centered education and a real-world perspective.

http://www.webster.edu

Experience Webster University — in two minutes

A historic mission. An inviting home campus: Founded in 1915, with five students and a pioneering educational mission, Webster has a history of shaping the future of higher education.

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Average class size: 10 : Small, highly interactive classes encourage innovation, collaboration, and self-expression.

Faculty-to-student ratio: 1:9 : Students have all the advantages of a student-centered university that supports personalized learning and gives every student an opportunity to excel.

Global locations: We have metropolitan, military, and corporate locations around the world, as well as traditional campuses in Asia, Europe, and North America. Our Study Abroad programs are ranked in the top 2 percent by U.S. News & World Report's "America's Best Colleges 2013."

163,000 Alumni: A growing and involved alumni community are connecting online, in-person, and at worldwide events.

One and only: Webster is the only Tier 1, private, nonprofit university with campus locations around the world including metropolitan, military, online and corporate, plus traditional, American-style campuses in North America, Europe, Africa and Asia.

Diversity is a core value: Webster is one of the most diverse universities in the country, which is an enduring part of our history and central to our future.Undergraduate and graduate programs. More than 75 different majors and around 60 graduate programs in a supportive, educational environment that allows students to excel.

A global, Tier 1, private, nonprofit university

* Global feature in academic programs. Globalized curriculum is our distinctive hallmark
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* Five schools and colleges: Arts & Sciences; Business & Technology; Communications; Education; and Fine Arts



Titles won by Webster University - SPICE in the past 2 years

World Championships (2)

June 2013
- 2013 World Blitz Championship: 1st place (GM Le Quang Liem)

July 2013
- 2013 World University Championship: 1st place (GM Wesley So)



National Championships (23)

August 2012
- 2012 U.S. Open Championship: 1st place (GM Manuel Leon Hoyos)
- 2012 U.S. Open Rapid (g/15) Championship: 1st place (GM Andre Diamant and IM Vitaly Neimer)
- 2012 U.S. Open Blitz Championship: 1st place (GM Andre Diamant), 2nd place (GM Anatoly Bykhovsky)

December 2012
- 2012 PanAm Intercollegiate Championship: Both A and B team tied for 1st place
- 2012 PanAm Intercollegiate Championship: Top reserve player (GM Manuel Leon Hoyos)

April 2013
- 2013 College Chess Final Four: 1st place (GMs Georg Meier, Wesley So, Ray Robson, Fidel Corrales Jimenez, Manuel Leon Hoyos, and Anatoly Bykhovsky)

June 2013
- 2013 National Open: 1st place (GMs Wesley So and Manuel Leon Hoyos)
- 2013 National Open Blitz Championship: 1st place (GM Wesley So)
- 2013 National G/10 Championship at National Open: 1st place (GM Wesley So)

August 2013
- 2013 US Open G/15 Championship: 1st place (GM Manuel Leon Hoyos)
- 2013 US Open Blitz Championship: 1st place (GM Manuel Leon Hoyos)

October 2013
- 2013 US National G/30 Championship: 1st place (GM Georg Meier)
- 2013 US National G/60 Championship: 1st place (GM Georg Meier)

December 2013
- 2013 PanAm Intercollegiate Championship: 1st place (A team won with a perfect 6-0 score)
- 2013 PanAm Intercollegiate Championship: Top board 1 (GMs Le Quang Liem, Fidel Corrales Jimenez)
- 2013 PanAm Intercollegiate Championship: Top board 2 (GM Anatoly Bykhovsky)
- 2013 PanAm Intercollegiate Championship: Top board 3 (GM Wesley So)
- 2013 PanAm Intercollegiate Championship: Top board 4 (GM Ray Robson)
- 2013 PanAm Intercollegiate Championship: Top overall performance (GM Wesley So)

April 2014
- 2014 College Chess Final Four: 1st place (GMs Le Quang Liem, Wesley So, Georg Meier, Ray Robson, Fidel Corrales Jimenez, and Anatoly Bykhovsky)

June 2014
- 2014 National Open Blitz Championship: 1st place (GM Wesley So)

July 2014
- 2014 World Open: 1st place tie (GM Illia Nyzhnyk)

August 2014
- 2014 US Open: 1st place tie (GM Illia Nyzhnyk)

Welcome to Carlsen - Anand Sochi World Championship Game 9 LIVE Commentary


Welcome to Carlsen - Anand Sochi World Championship game 9 (LIVE commentary by me).

Thanks for joining me. After 8 games, the score is 4.5 - 3.5 in favor of Magnus.

We are down to just four games. It is pressure time for both players, especially Anand. There is no room for any error. One more loss and the match is virtually over.

Magnus, on the other hand, does have a little margin for error. However, a loss at this stage not only will allow Anand to be back in the match, but the momentum will heavily shift to the other side.

This is what a World Championship is all about!

Here are the rules of the match:

The Match is played over a maximum of twelve games and the winner of the match shall be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the scores are level after the twelve games, after a new drawing of colors, four tie-break games shall be played. The games shall be played using the electronic clock starting with 25 minutes for each player with an increment of 10 seconds after each move. In case the match is still drawn, a match of 2 games shall be played with a time control of 5 minutes plus 3 seconds increment after each move. In case of a level score, another 2-game match will be played to determine a winner. If still there is no winner after 5 such matches (total 10 games), one sudden-death game will be played.

I am also doing interactive commentary on www.twitter.com/susanpolgar and www.facebook.com/polgarchess.

I do not expect Anand to go all out. It is too early. He will try to hold with black and try with white.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 We have another Berlin.

5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Ke8 Black can no longer castle, and can choose to put his King on the Queenside with eventual c8 then b7 or Kingside.

10. Nc3 h5 11. Ne2 This is the first deviation. This means that Magnus wants something more than what he got from previous Berlin game.

11...b6 Unlike a sharper opening like Sicilian where precision/every tempo counts, it's more flexible with the Berlin.

12. Rd1 Ba6 In the Berlin, black voluntarily allows the Queen exchange, forfeits his right to castle, and allows the double c pawn. However, Black gets the Bishop pair. Usually positional players with strong endgame skill like the Berlin. Without Queens on the board, the inability to castle does not mean much. Even with the deviation from Magnus, Anand is well prepared .

13. Nf4 Not sure why Magnus spent so much time on 13. Nf4. We are still in book play. Anand is experienced with WC match play. In spite of being down 1 point, he's not in panic mode, safe play with black pushes with white. He will only in an all out gamble mode in game 12.

13...Bb7 White has to be careful always in the Berlin. If he overpushes, it can backfire. Patience is required by both sides.


14. e6 Bd6 was played immediately. It seems that Anand is still in his preparation and Magnus does not know it, or is trying to remember it. It is impossible to prepare for every possible openings / lines. Therefore, the element of surprise is important in WC matches.


When I made a comeback in 2003-04 after not playing since 1996, I added the Berlin to my repertoire. It is a very solid opening.

15. exf7+ Kxf7 16. Ng5+ Kf6 17. Ne4+ Kf7 Anand is still playing super fast. The position is equal.

18. Ng5+ Kf6 19. Ne4+ Kf7 20. Ng5+ draw by repetition!

Chennai commentary team is back for game 10 and 11 http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2014/11/chennai-commentary-team-is-back-for.html. It is FREE for all. I am very excited to work with GM Ramesh RB again.